paper free of animal derivatives – status 2017

I thought I would share the information here as well, since I just wrote about it to a reader. I haven’t done those – if you will – reminders -in the past; only passed  gathered information on in replies to reader enquiries but not mentioned them on here; but I think it might be informative to more.

About paper:

in 2017, I collected information about following brands selling paper products free of animal derivatives (see compendium):

  • Hahnemühle: all FineArt paper products, technical papers and canvases are free of animal derivatives,with the exception of Photo Silk Baryta and PastellFix (status 2017);  now Hahnemühle even labels new products that are free of animal derivatives; (they even sell coloured watercolour paper now)

Hahnemühle website

Hahnemühle Compendium entry

  • Fabriano : all paper  except three, are free of animal derivatives. The exceptions are Roma, Esportazione and Secolo XIII  (status: March 2017)

Fabriano website

Fabriano compendium entry

  • Strathmore: all paper products are free of animal derivatives except  Gemini Watercolour Paper. (status: 2017)

Strathmore website

Strathmore compendium entry

tip-to-tip: water-reservoir brush+watercolour crayons, sticks and co.

Instead of using watercolours in pans, you can use  watercolour pencils, sticks/gelatos and crayons  with a water-reservoir brush or stiffer regular brush, but in the way you would paint with pans.

Tip-to-tip transfer: Brush over your water-soluble crayon/stick etc. (use more strokes to intensify the colour) and then apply it onto the paper. Alternatively draw  with the crayon direcly on the edge of the paper or a separate paper and take the colour with the brush from there.

This way the colour application is much softer than drawing directly on the paper and going over the lines with a brush. You can colour a dainty little drawing or cover a DinA3 and larger paper with beautiful patterns.

If you don’t have a watercolour travel pan set, you can always take your pencils, crayons etc. and a water-reservoir brush pen. There will be no spills, it does not take up too much space and you have double the use out of the pencils. Using them with the brush and also drawing details directly with them.

It is also something different to go over the crayon/pencil with a wet brush than immersing the whole crayon/pencil tip in water, which can damage the lead.

I also went over a Faber Castell Pitt Artist Brush Pen with the water-reservoir brush to take colour and transfer to the paper. After drying the colour is going nowhere, because of the waterproof ink used in the pens.                                                                                                                                      Why would someone do this to an already brush shaped pen tip ? You can cover a bigger area this way than with the small, less flexible brush pen tip; you can gently glaze the paper and if your brush pens are older, you still get good use out of them without having to draw streaky (although I found it can make also nice effects).

Painting on wet paper with the laden brush  helps covering the paper surface quicker.

left side: tip-to-tip transfer, on wet surface; right side: paper-to-brush transfer+wet brush over applied colour